"Fight for the Water" By Frederic Remington, until recently, hung inappropriately in the BVGCD boardroom for over 10 years. The fight for water has always been portrayed by some as Robertson Vs. Brazos County. However, the real battle is being waged by the cities of Bryan and College Station against the property rights of both Brazos and Robertson county landowners.

"Fight for the Water" By Frederic Remington, until recently, hung inappropriately in the BVGCD boardroom for over 10 years. The fight for water has always been portrayed by some as Robertson Vs. Brazos County. However, the real battle is apparently being waged by the cities of Bryan and College Station against the property rights of both Brazos and Robertson county landowners.

 

     Lets clear something up right now. Robertson County is not in a fight with Brazos county over water. Some would like you to believe that is the case because that helps them hide one fact that is staring us all in the face. Local municipalities want control of your property. The real fight is about property rights. It is about your water not their water. The only water they own is the water beneath land they own (which is very little).

     Through the creation of our water district the municipalities have essentially controlled the rule making process. Rules that have benefited the municipalities to the point of being able to get permits for twice the amount of water they actually use while landowners are stuck with permits for water they have actually used. (Future growth for city needs but not for landowner needs)

     Then on top of that we have municipal management ridding heard on landowners water use and hounding the water district staff as to whether or not the landowner has pumped too much water to produce food crops.

    The Texas Supreme Court has ruled that the landowner owns water in place as if it were oil and gas. There is no question about that fact. And,  there is no question about the fact that local municipalities have spent more time trying to finagle the water away from the landowner instead of trying to negotiate the purchase of that water from the landowner.

     Unfortunately for the local municipalities they are wasting time and money trying to take water while outfits like San Antonio come into the area and start negotiating leases on the open market. If Bryan and College Station don’t change their ways it is very possible that in the near future they will be buying water from San Antonio.

     There is no one in this argument that wants to keep Bryan and College Station From getting water. We are however, darn certain, that we will not stand idly by and let them take what they should buy before San Antonio buys it… right from under their noses.

 

John Melvin

Executive Director

Brazos Valley Groundwater Rights Association